Ladylike Etiquette: Sending Holiday Cards

There’s something incredibly special about keeping up traditions that touch the hearts of loved ones, family, and friends.

And this particular tradition or etiquette rule is something I have been doing since I started writing. My mother spent a great deal of time making sure I wrote neatly but also thoughtfully. But she also taught me the importance of making sure everyone around me felt cherished, thought of, and appreciated.

Sending holiday greeting and thank you cards is the perfect way to remind someone of how important they are to you. And it only costs a few dollars to create and send. The art of writing a greeting or thank you for the holidays shows your gratitude on a deeper level in an age of digital and fast communication.

Today I’d like to encourage all my readers to send snail mail holiday greeting and thank you cards this season. It’s a tradition that is not done by millennial any longer and one I personally believe still holds sentimental value much better than a text or email ever could. Keep reading for my top tips on sending holiday cards.

 

Choose Your Cards Carefully

Sometimes humorous cards or cards with religious messages may be considered inappropriate depending on the person you are sending it to. My advice is to stay clear of religious cards and buy one set of humorous cards and one set of a general “season’s greetings” cards. Then, if you wish to include a religious message, do so in the contents of the card.

 

Snail Mail or Email?

This depends largely on who you are sending cards to. If to someone who is elderly or more old fashioned, send the card through the post. If to colleagues or close friends, an email greeting card is acceptable (although I highly encourage you to send cards through the post for everyone).

 

What to Write

There’s only so much room on a greeting card so avoid writing an essay. On the first line, address your card to the recipient such as “Dear so and so”

In the next section include your holiday greeting and well wishes. If you have received a gift, thank them for their gift and express how you are using it or how you plan to use it. Feel free to include a little note about seeing them soon or wishing them and their families well.

Lastly. sign off with a “Sincerely”, “Best Wishes”, or “Merry Christmas”. Include your first and last name if sending to an acquaintance. Signing off with a first name or together as a family is acceptable if to close friends or relatives.

 

When to Send

As soon as possible in December to assure arrival if sending a greeting. If sending a thank you note, as soon as you have received the gift or shortly after. Avoid sending anything too late after New Years. A good deadline is January 15th for all thank you cards to have been received. You can send a New Years card as a thank you as to avoid any holiday themes.

 

One last note: sending holiday cards is a nice thing to do if someone has sent you one. Not hearing back from you or getting a text that says “thanks” is not only rude but also disheartening. If after reading this you still don’t believe sending cards is worth your time I encourage you to at least call people who have sent you cards or presents and give them the same greeting over the phone. It’s so much more generous than a text or email.

 

MY FAVORITE HOLIDAY CARDS

 

 

 

Are you planning to send holiday cards? Leave a comment below if you are! I’d love to know if I’m the only one doing this.